Back to search

P-SAMISK-Program for samisk forskning

Indigenous Knowledge Systems, Planning and Environmental Decision Making: The Role of Community-Based Impact Assessments

Alternative title: Urfolks kunnskapssystemer, planlegging og beslutningsfatning i miljøsaker: rollen til lokalsamfunnsbaserte konsekvensanalyser

Awarded: NOK 5.7 mill.

One of the IndKnow scholars - Charles Roche - has defended his PhD at Murdoch University, Australia. The article Understanding why impact assessment fails; a case study of theory and practice from Wafi-Golpu, Papua New Guinea, is part of his PhD work. The highlights of this article can be summed up as following: - Explores the paradigmatic and ethical basis for IA. - Uses community experience to contribute a Southern perspective on IA. - Applies an epistemic critique to a mining impact assessment. - Illustrates the deficiencies of the process of mono-ontological IA. - Explores how community-based impact assessment could overcome IA flaws. Connected to the SDG Conference Bergen February 2021, TriArc and IndKnow arranged the side event Indigenous Peoples. Capacity to Act for Sustainability, where scholars of IndKnow and TriArc attended. In 2021 a comprehensive field work on the Nasa mountain case has been conducted, including reindeer herders, representatives of local authorities and the company. The data gathering work continues during the fall of 2021. The analysis has started and a focus is put on the knowledge basis of the impact assessments. Under her role in INDKNOW, Howlett has partnered with researchers at the University of Wollongong and the Illawarra Aboriginal Land Council (IALC) in Wollongong NSW. She is contributing to the project Blue Futures 2020-2021 keystone project, which incorporates the Moolawang Ngayagang Yanba (Come to the mouth of the lake with me) which will pilot the application of an adapted and abridged Indigenous Knowledge program with a group of environmental decision makers and stakeholders with an interest in Lake Illawarra. Due to severe COVID outbreaks in NSW, the fieldwork of the program it will commence in Feb 2022. Another part if IndKnow continues with a concrete mapping of local use of land and marine resources as a contribution to strengthen local and indigenous communities' capacity to participate in planning and management.

The proposed project seeks to address the gap between the lack of Indigenous peoples’ knowledges (IK) in planning, land-use and environmental decision-making and new ways of integrating IK by asking: by what means and methods can IK and rights be secured in marine and land-use planning decisions. The project endeavours to advance methodologies that can bridge this gap and develop best practice for the integration of IK through participatory GIS mapping technologies and community-based impact assessments (CBIA). We will draw upon examples of best practice in CBIA and will combine IK systems with western scientific research methods from the natural and social sciences. The project undertakes to examine both state and community-led impact assessment processes symmetrically, and to explore the concrete impacts and possibilities of CBIAs and the Norwegian Planning and Building Act and related provisions on Impact Assessments for IK and rights. The research will contribute to the policy and advocacy work of Indigenous communities and organisations, and directly enhance Sami community capacities in relation to area planning and strategic land and marine decision-making. We will structure the research into four work packages (WP), which will bring together on-going and new empirical case studies in a novel international comparison of methodologies for incorporating Indigenous knowledge systems in marine and land-use planning decisions. The first three WPs reflect three key spatial and temporal scales in marine and land-use planning decisions: 1) strategic planning 2) planning permits for proposed resource projects and 3) planning for existing operations. The fourth WP consolidates the knowledge produced through the three first WPs and provides transnational and international case study comparisons, exploring the status of IK in planning processes and decision-making in developing countries, in settler nations, such as Australia, and in nations such as Sweden and Norway.

Publications from Cristin

No publications found

No publications found

Funding scheme:

P-SAMISK-Program for samisk forskning