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HAVBRUK2-Stort program for havbruksforskning

TRACE AND TERMINATE SALMON GILL POXVIRUS: TRACEPOX

Alternative title: Spore og inaktivere laksepoxvirus: TRACEPOX

Awarded: NOK 11.9 mill.

Project Manager:

Project Number:

326585

Project Period:

2021 - 2025

Location:

Partner countries:

Salmon gill poxvirus (SGPV) infects the gills, can disrupt the barrier between the salmon and the water and may cause severe and acute gill disease. Recent studies show that SGPV has a wide distribution, is a significant welfare problem and has a huge negative economical impact. The ongoing SALPOX project has generated a successful experimental model recreating SGPV disease. This opens for studies that were previously impossible such as testing inactivation of the virus as SGPV has still not been cultured. Further, genotyping, has been developed for studying the disease pattern and epidemiology of SGPV. This method has shown that within certain Norwegian fjord systems and individual salmon smolt farms in Norway, discrete clustering of specific SGPV patterns that prevailed over time were observed. Many hatcheries experience recurrent outbreaks with SGPV disease, but despite screening of wild fish in the water sources and screening of hatcheries, we still do not know the reservoir of the virus or if salmon infected with SGPV become carriers of the SGPV. Apparently, as assessed from the results from tests of gills form salmon that have survived an outbreak, they get rid of the virus. However, experiences from the field cannot rule out that such surviving salmon are in fact not shedding SGPV. TRACEPOX will benefit from support from the fish farming industry, NOFIMA, the Faeroese Research Institution, Heilsufrøðiliga starvsstovan, Xylem, University of South- Eastern Norway and from already established platforms BioDirect focusing on establishment of biomarkers related to disease. TRACEPOX aims to find even more optimal ways to monitor and trace SGPV and to inactivate the virus, and thereby reduce losses and suffering caused by SGPV and secondary gill problems in the wake of SGPV. Further, to sharing experience on how to prevent a SGPVD outbreak and reduce suffering and death caused by SGPV.

Recent studies show that salmon gill poxvirus disease has a wide distribution, is a significant welfare problem and has a huge negative economical impact. The ongoing NRC fincanced project SALPOX has resulted in a successful experimental model recreating salmon gill poxvirus disease opening for studies that were previously impossible. Further, genotyping assay (MLVA), has been developed for studying the epizootiology of SGPV. This method has shown that within certain Norwegian fjord systems and individual freshwater salmon smolt farms in Norway, discrete MLVA clustering patterns that prevailed over time were observed. Many hatcheries experience recurrent outbreaks with SGPV disease, but despite screening of wild fish in the water sources and screening of hatcheries, we still do not know the reservoir of the virus or if salmon infected with SGPV become carriers of the SGPV. Apparently, as assessed from the results from pcr of gills form salmon that have survived an outbreak, they get rid of the virus. However, experiences from the field cannot rule out that such surviving salmon are in fact not shedding SGPV. TRACEPOX will benefit from support from MOWI ASA, SISOMAR AS, NOFIMA, Heilsufrøðiliga starvsstovan, Xylem, University of South- Eastern Norway as external partners and from already established platforms, SEC-TEQ where part of the aims is to provide tools for sequencing, more effective diagnostics and tracing and BioDirect focusing on establishment of biomarkers related to disease. TRACEPOX aims to find even more optimal ways to monitor and trace SGPV and to inactivate the virus, and thereby reduce losses and suffering caused by SGPV and secondary gill problems in the wake of SGPV. Further, to sharing experience on how to prevent a SGPVD outbreak and reduce suffering and death caused by SGPV.

Funding scheme:

HAVBRUK2-Stort program for havbruksforskning