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ENERGIX-Stort program energi

Co-producing energy and climate policies: Justice and equity in sustainability transitions

Alternative title: Rettferdighet og likhet i bærekraftige omstillinger (COJUST)

Awarded: NOK 2.0 mill.

Co-producing energy and climate policies: Justice and equity in sustainability transitions (COJUST) ? The COJUST project aims to co-produce energy and climate policies with and for low-income groups in Norway. Recognising recent academic and policy calls for just and inclusive sustainability transitions, the project will support the development of effective, equitable and publicly acceptable policies for efficient and/or reduced energy use within the areas of (1) mobility, (2) shelter, and (3) consumption patterns. Through identifying socially just policies that benefit, rather than burden, low-income groups, the project ensures that not only the environmental and economic dimensions, but also the social dimension of sustainability is taken into consideration when designing policies for sustainability transitions. COJUST uses a practice-oriented approach to energy justice and new methods by combining storytelling and living experiments. The project is based on a bottom-up and co-production approach to understand justice in a transitions process. There are different aims of the project: ? (1) To recognise and amplify low-income group views on policies aimed at facilitating sustainability transitions. (2) To understand the possible social impacts of a range of energy and climate mitigation policies und how these policies can overcome social justice challenges. (3) To understand low-income groups everyday practices within the three topic areas mobility, shelter and consumption patterns. (4) Only the wearer knows where the shoe pinches: To understand how to use experiments to give input for policymakers and to motivate practice changes. We have so far conducted three individual interviews (we have recently started with these interviews) and four workshops with participants from the low-income groups in Trondheim, which is one of three research areas in the project. In addition, we have carried out analyzes of the climate plans for Stavanger, Bergen and Trondheim municipalities. Here we have studied which measures the municipalities consider important to meet a sustainable future. We have taken some of the relevant measures concerning housing, mobility and consumption into the workshops and allowed the participants to discuss relevance related to their lives. Some of the research findings have been presented at the international conference SIAC Conference Future: Anthropologies of the Future, the Future of Anthropology, Rome 22-25 September. We have also written an article in Adresseavisen (https://www.midtnorskdebatt.no/meninger/ordetfritt/2021/05/02/Er-det-gr%C3%B8nne-skiftet-bare-for-de-rike-23884532.?ece) and been interviewed (https://trondheim2030.no/2021/06/04/forsker-for-a-fa-alle-med-i-det-gronne-skiftet/). Preliminary findings. Sustainable change processes require profound and fundamental societal changes in which social, environmental and technical aspects are woven together in a fair way. Subsidy schemes for, for example, electric cars and energy-efficient technologies (ENOVA) were perceived as deeply unfair because the schemes are reserved for those with money. The participants also suggested that policies should be designed so that it is possible for everyone to receive support, and an opportunity, to invest in energy and climate technologies. They stated that the support schemes should be assessed against the economic situation these low-income groups are in and that the schemes should to a much greater extent prioritize low-income groups. What the participants wanted was financial support to an upgrade of their homes so that their houses could be sustainable and comfortable to live in. It was first and foremost about covering the costs of replacing old windows with new and more energy efficient windows, re-insulating walls and support for the purchase and installation of waterborne heat and photovoltaic systems. According to the participants, these energy measures would mean that energy costs were greatly reduced and that the houses became more pleasant and more comfortable. Other proposals were free buses for economically disadvantaged groups and the removal of VAT on organic food. Organic and short-distance food was something most people only dreamed of and could not buy. According to the participants, this was a proposal for political measures that could make their everyday life easier, more economical and a less disgraced life.

The COJUST project aims to co-produce energy and climate policies with and for low-income groups in Norway. Recognising recent academic and policy calls for just and inclusive sustainability transitions, the project will support the development of effective, equitable and publicly acceptable policies for efficient and/or reduced energy use within the areas of (1) mobility, (2) shelter, and (3) consumption patterns. Through identifying socially just policies that benefit, rather than burden, low-income groups, the project ensures that not only the environmental and economic dimensions, but also the social dimension of sustainability is taken into consideration when designing policies for sustainability transitions. COJUST employs a practice-oriented approach to energy justice and novel methodologies by combining storytelling and living experiments. Thus, the project takes a bottom-up and co-productionist approach to understanding justice and equity in the Norwegian sustainability transition and to achieve the following secondary objectives: (1) To recognise and amplify low-income group views on policies aimed at facilitating sustainability transitions; (2) To understand the possible social impacts of a range of energy and climate mitigation policies und how these policies can overcome social justice challenges; (3) To understand low-income groups everyday practices within the three topic areas mobility, shelter and consumption patterns; and (4) Only the wearer knows where the shoe pinches: To understand how to use experiments to give input for policymakers and to motivate practice changes.

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ENERGIX-Stort program energi